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Rain-Rein or Reign

Rain-Rein or Reign

Rain-Rein or Reign

Learn about rain, rein and reign – some of the most commonly confused homophones in the English language.

1. Watch the video

  1. Watch the video without captions to test your listening.
  2. Then watch it with captions to check your understanding.

You can switch on and off the captions in the video for this activity.

2. Activity

After watching the video, complete the following activity. Fill in the blanks with rain, rein or reign.

1. Have you looked at how you can _____________ in your spending?

2. It is expected to _____________ during the parade to celebrate the queen’s ____________.

3. I hope it’s not going to ____________ when I’m out later.

4. Has she taken over the ______________s of the company?

5. Australian TV might upend reality TV’s ________________ in the years to come.

Transcript:

In today’s English On The Go, we look at the difference between rain, rein and reign.

Rain is water that falls from the sky. It can be a noun and a verb.

The rain came down fast.

Rein refers to a long, thin strap used to control a horse.

“Hold on to the reins,” the instructor yelled out.

When rein is used in other situations, it’s usually used to talk about being in control in other ways.

For instance, if someone hands over the reins to you, it usually means they are handing over control.

It was time to hand over the reins to the next generation.

To rein something in can mean to control.

I decided to rein in my spending.

But free rein or full rein can mean to have full freedom to do what you want.

They had free rein over the budget for the project.

Reign is often used to talk about the rule of a royal king or queen.

It can be used as a verb or a noun.

He was a very popular king during his reign.

The queen reigned for many decades.

So how do you remember the difference?

For rain, remember the rhyme rain rain go away.

For rein, remember the word restrain which also means to control.

Rein and restrain have R-E in them.

And for reign, remember a great king or queen which will help you add the silent ‘g’ to reign.

Answers to activity:

1. Have you looked at how you can rein in your spending?

2. It is expected to rain during the parade to celebrate the queen’s reign.

3. I hope it’s not going to rain when I’m out later.

4. Has she taken over the reins of the company?

5. Australian TV might upend reality TV’s reign in the years to come.

Will or Going to?

Will or Going to

Learn English Grammar – Will or Going to?

We use ‘will’ to talk about things that we believe will happen in the future:

‘I will replace the rusty tap next week.’

‘My brother will turn 30 in May.’

‘There will be a new school built here next year.’

We also use ‘will’ at the moment we make a decision.

‘I think I will come for a walk with you after all.’

‘I will try one of those chocolate cakes, just let me finish my ice cream.’

We also use ‘going to’ to talk about the future, but when there is a connection to our present situation.

So we use ‘going to’ when we have already decided or already planned to do something.

‘I’m going to the street festival this weekend.’

‘I’m going to meet my sister after work.’

And we use ‘going to’ when there is evidence in the present or a sign that something is going to happen:

‘I felt a raindrop on my neck. It’s going to rain.’

‘Be careful, you’re going to spill your milkshake.’

Emigrate or Immigrate-Eminent or Imminent

Emigrate or Immigrate-Eminent or Imminent
Emigrate or Immigrate-Eminent or Imminent

Emigrate or Immigrate-Eminent or Imminent

They might look very similar and sound almost the same but beware of these words: emigrate vs immigrate and eminent vs imminent. Take a look at how you can remember them in this video.

1. Watch the video

  1. Watch the video without captions to test your listening.
  2. Then watch it with captions to check your understanding.

You can switch on and off the captions in the video for this activity.

2. Activity

After watching the video, complete the following activity. Fill in the blanks with emigrate, immigrate, eminent or imminent.

1. The _____________ lecturer’s talk was sold out.

2. “It looks like a storm is _______________,” she said.

3. What are the steps to take if people want to _______________ to Australia?

4. When my parents ________________d from their home country, they didn’t bring much with them.

5. He decided to ________________ to the neighbouring country despite the ________________ danger.

Transcript:

Today’s English On The Go lesson is on emigrate or immigrate and eminent or imminent.

Emigrate and immigrate are two verbs we use to talk about moving to countries.

To emigrate means to leave your own country and go to another country.

My grandparents emigrated from India to Australia in the 1900s.

To immigrate means to enter another country.

My grandparents immigrated to Australia in the 1900s.

Here’s one way to remember the difference between the two.

Emigrate means to exit.

Emigrate and exit start with an e.

Immigrate means to come in.

Both immigrate and in start with the letter i.

Then there’s eminent and imminent.

Eminent is an adjective.

It can refer to someone or something that is very prominent, famous or noteworthy.

She is an eminent leader.

The eminent professor was awarded a medal for his work.

Imminent is also an adjective.

It can mean that something is about to happen very soon.

The CEO’s departure was imminent.

We knew a thunderstorm was imminent.

To remember the difference, you can think of leader and professor.

Both have Es in the them.

So if you’re talking about a famous or prominent leader, you need to use eminent with an e.

Answers to activity:

1. The eminent lecturer’s talk was sold out.

2. “It looks like a storm is imminent,” she said.

3. What are the steps to take if people want to immigrate to Australia?

4. When my parents emigrated from their home country, they didn’t bring much with them.

5. He decided to immigrate to the neighbouring country despite the imminent danger.

Who-Whom-Whose or Who’s

Who-Whom-Whose or Who’s

Who-Whom-Whose or Who’s

Using who, whom, whose and who’s can be very confusing in English. We break down the confusion in this video.

1. Watch the video

  1. Watch the video without captions to test your listening.
  2. Then watch it with captions to check your understanding.

You can switch on and off the captions in the video for this activity.

2. Activity

After the watching video, complete the following activity. Fill in the blanks with who, whom, whose or who’s.

1. _______________ ate all the lasagne?

2. _______________ watch are you wearing?

3. To ________________ is this addressed?

4. _________________ coming for tea tonight?

5. ______________ was the founding leader of this group?

Transcript:

In today’s English On The Go, we look at who, whom, whose and who’s.

Who, whom and whose come from a class of pronouns called interrogative pronouns.

These pronouns are usually used to ask questions. Who is usually used when asking questions about people.

Who spoke at the conference?

Who moved the chair?

One way to make sure you’re using who correctly is to use she or he as a replacement in the sentence.

Who spoke at the conference? He spoke at the conference.

Who moved the chair? She moved the chair.

Whom is the object form of who. As an interrogative pronoun, whom is primarily used in formal writing.

To whom does the bag belong? Whom does the bag belong to? Who does the bag belong to?

But who is far more regularly used in informal settings.

Whose is the possessive form. It means belonging to.

Whose friend are you? Whose chair did you move?

Who’s is a contraction of two words, who is or who has.

Who’s coming today? Who is coming today?

Who’s got your hat? Who has got your hat?

Answers to activity:

1. Who ate all the lasagne?

2. Whose watch are you wearing?

3. To whom is this addressed?

4. Who’s coming for tea tonight?

5. Who was the founding leader of this group?

Blow and throw

Blow and throw

difference between Blow and throw

What are the different forms of the verbs ‘blow’ and ‘throw’? Let’s take a closer look at the examples below to learn more.

To ‘blow’ can mean to cause something to move because of air currents.

‘The wind blows your hair.’

The past participle is ‘blown’.

‘The seeds are being blown away.’

The past tense is ‘blew’.

‘The wind blew this tree over.’

To ‘throw’ means to move something with force using one’s arm or hand.

‘You throw a spear.’

The past tense is ‘threw’.

‘He threw a spear and caught a fish.’

The past participle is ‘thrown’.

‘The mattress has been thrown out.’

Rise or raise?

Rise or raise

Rise or raise?

‘Rise’ and ‘raise’ are verbs we use when we are talking about something going up. Do you know when to use these words? Read on to learn more!

‘Rise’ and ‘raise’ both mean to go up.

Generally, things rise by themselves.

Hot air rises.

The sun rises.

Someone has to raise something.

You raise your eyebrows.

You raise your glass.

Learn English Grammar-Suffixes

Suffixes

A suffix is a letter or a group of letters that are added to the end of a word to make a new word. Here are some tips on using the suffixes ‘-able’, ‘-ous’ and ‘-ly’.

The act of selling is a sale.

Adding the ‘-able’ suffix to it form the adjective.

It is a saleable oyster. It is able to be sold.

Another use of the ‘-able’ suffix is with the word ‘adjustable’.

You adjust or change the position of things to have them in the right spot.

You form the adjective with ‘-able’.

They are adjustable lines. They are able to be adjusted.

Another common suffix used to form adjectives is ‘-ous’.

An example is ‘continuous’.

‘Continuously’ has two suffixes – ‘-ous’ and ‘-ly’.

This is how the ‘continue’ is modified to become ‘continuously’:

  • Continue (verb) + ‘-ous’ = Continuous (adjective)
  • Continuous (adjective) + ‘-ly’ = Continuously (adverb)

Commonly Used Noun Suffixes

Commonly used noun suffixes

Many words in English are formed from the same root or base word. By adding different suffixes, a range of new words can be formed.

A suffix is a letter or a group of letters that are added to the end of a word to make a new word. Generally, suffixes have a particular meaning. When a suffix is added to a base word and that base word becomes a noun, it is called a noun suffix.

Here are some rules:

  • Adding a suffix usually changes the class of the word (i.e. verb to noun).

For example:

Root/Base word: Entertain (verb)

Suffix: -ment

New word: Entertainment (noun)

  • Adding a suffix can mean the class of the word remains the same but the meaning of the new word changes.

For example:

Root/Base word: quest (noun)

Suffix: -ion

New word: question (noun)

  • Adding a suffix can cause a spelling change.

For example:

Root/Base word: supervise

Suffix: -or

New word: supervisor

Here are some commonly used noun suffixes and what they mean:

Suffixes forming nouns Meaning Examples
-ant/-ent someone who does something or something that has a particular function student, president, resident, assistant, defendant, accountant, deodorant
-ee someone who does something addressee, interviewee, referee, trainee, employee, refugee, trustee, lessee, retiree
-er, -or someone who does something, something that does a particular job writer, teacher, worker, dancer, buyer, actor, supervisor
-ism belief, behaviour, theory or act of journalism, criticism, vegetarianism, humanism
-ist person connected with, person with a belief in journalist, feminist, violinist, pianist
-ment forming abstract nouns government, enjoyment, management, improvement, development
-ness quality or state happiness, kindness, forgiveness, goodness
-sion, -tion quality or state discussion, excursion, population, information, communication, question
-ship quality or state friendship, citizenship, leadership, membership
-ity quality or state ability, security, similarity, curiousity

Verb Suffixes

verb suffixes

Find out more about verb suffixes and how they can extend your vocabulary as well as help you remember meanings of new words.

A suffix is a letter or a group of letters that are added to the end of a word to make a new word. Generally, suffixes have a particular meaning. When a suffix is added to a base word and that base word becomes a verb, it is called a verb suffix.

Learning the meanings of suffixes has two key advantages:

  • They can help you extend your vocabulary and work out the meaning of unfamiliar words.
  • They can help you remember the meanings of words most easily.

Many words in English are formed from the same root or base word. By adding different suffixes, a range of new words can be formed.

Here are some commonly used noun suffixes and what they mean:

Suffixes forming verbs Meaning Examples
-ate To bring about a state Demonstrate, generate, communicate, suffocate, illustrate
-en To become Shorten, thicken, widen, strengthen
-ify To make something, to become Clarify, identify, modify, simplify
-ise To do something, to become Criticise, realise, modernise, optimise

Here are some examples:

I like to communicate with my team.

We decided to widen the roads.

Can you please clarify what you meant by that?

realise the importance of suffixes now that I have learnt them.

Take note of these general rules when it comes to suffixes:

  • Adding a suffix usually changes the class of the word
  • Adding a suffix can mean the class of the word remains the same but the meaning of the new word changes.
  • Adding a suffix can cause a spelling change.

Beautiful English Words

Beautiful English Words
Beautiful English Words

WHAT ARE THE Beautiful English WordsS IN ENGLISH TODAY?

Below you will find the 500 most used words in English, in alphabetical order.

Why are they in alphabetical order and not grouped into different themes?

Well…

Although it may initially appear easier to learn words in groups such as colors, animals, and sports, for example, research shows that you will remember the most common words used in English by studying them in alphabetical order.

WHY SHOULD I LEARN THE 500 MOST Beautiful English Words WORDS?

If you want to learn English and connect with other English speakers as quickly as possible, learning these words will help you to understand the English world around you more quickly. You will understand instructions, everyday English topics, and be able to respond well to questions.

If you are joining us this Summer to skyrocket your learning, even more, studying these words will build a strong foundation for you before you arrive!

Click here to download the whole 500 words

WHAT IS THE BEST WAY TO LEARN THE MOST COMMONLY USED WORDS IN ENGLISH?

Before you start, we recommend you…

DOWNLOAD OUR FREE 500 Beautiful English Words USED IN ENGLISH

Click here to download your free list of common words in English

You can then study the most popular words in English as you wish.

Do you need some study ideas?

TAKE ONE SET OF LETTER WORDS AT A TIME

We recommend learning one set of letter words at a time. You can print them off and cut them out or save them to your laptop or phone.

Some letter sets are very long so they have been split in two. Some are very short so they have been combined with other letters.

Why not start with all the words beginning with A? Or, start backward from Z?

TRY AND REMEMBER THE WORDS IN THE WAY YOU LEARN BEST

Everyone has a different way to remember what they are learning. You could translate the words into your own language if it helps you, or draw an image to remind yourself what the word is and means. You could also make your own recordings on your phone.

HAVE A DICTIONARY WITH YOU

We also recommend that you use an online or paperback dictionary when you’re studying.

Do this so that you can fully understand:

a) what the word means

b) how to pronounce it

c) how to use it

HAVE FUN!

It can be hard to motivate yourself to learn English sometimes. Remind yourself why you want to learn English when you are feeling demotivated. And have fun with the words you learn! Try and practice using your newly learnt words with friends and family. Use the words in sentences and different situations when you can.

Studying the most important words in English is good but using them in real life is so much better!

LET’S GET STARTED WITH THE Beautiful English Words IN ENGLISH

Remember that you can download your free 500-word list here.

You can also bookmark this page in your browser and come back to it when you want to study.

This list contains, among many others, the most Beautiful English Words verbs and the most common nouns in English. Let’s get started!

A

a
about
act
actually
add
after
again
against
age
ago
air
all
also
always
am
among
an
and
animal
another
answer
appear
are
area
as
ask
at

B

back
ball
base
be
beauty
because
become
bed
been
before
began
begin
behind
best
better
better
between
big
bird
black
blue
boat
body
book
both
bottom
box
boy
bring
brought
build
built
busy
but
by

C

call
came
can
car
care
carefully
carry
centre
certain
change
check
child
children
city
class
clear
close
cold
colour
come
common
community
complete
contain
could
country
course
create
cried
cross
cry
cut

D

dark
day
decide
decided
deep
develop
did
didn’t
different
do
does
dog
don’t
door
down
draw
dream
drive
dry
during

E

each
early
earth
east
easy
eat
effort
enough
every
example
experience
explain
eye

F

face
fact

false
family
far
farm
fast
father
feel
feet
few
field
find
fire
first
fish
five
fly
follow
food
form
found
four
friend
from
front
full

G

game
gave
get
girl
give
go
gold
good
got
government
great
green
ground
group
grow
guy

H

had
half
hand
happen
happened
hard
has
have
he
hear
heat
heavy
help
her
here
high
his
hold
home
horse
hot
hour
house
hundred

I, J, K

I
idea
if
important
in
inch
include
into
is
island
it

just

keep
kind
king
knew
know
known

L

land
language
large
last
late
later
laugh
lead
learn
leave
left
less
less
let
letter
life
light
like
line
list
listen
little
live
long
look
love
low

M

machine
made
make
man
many
map
mark
may
mean
measure
men
might
mile
million
mind
minute
miss
money
month
moon
more
more
morning
most
mother
mountain
move
much
music
must
my

N

name
nation
near
need
never
new
next
night
no
north
note
notice
noun
now
number

O

object
of
off
office
often
oh
oil
old
on
once
one
only
open
or
order
other
our
out
over

P

page
pair
part
pass
passed
people
perhaps
person
picture
place
plan
plane
plant
play
point
power
probably
problem
product
provide
pull
put

Q, R

question
quick
rain
ran
reach
read
ready
real
receive
record
red
relationship
remember
right
river
road
rock
room
round
rule
run

S

said
same
saw
say
school
science
sea
season
second
see
seem
self
sentence
serve
set
several
shape
she
ship
short
should
show
shown
side
simple
since
sing
sit
six
size
sleep

S CONTINUED…

slow
small
snow
so
some
something
song
soon
sound
south
space
special
spell
spring
stand
star
start
stay
step
stood
stop
story
street
strong
study
such
summer
sun
system

T

table
take
talk
teach
tell
ten
test
than
that
the
their
them
then
there
these
they
thing
think
this
those
though
thought
thousand
three

T CONTINUED…

through
time
to
together
told
too
took
top
toward
town
travel
tree
try

true
turn
two

U, V

under
understand
until
up
upon
us
use
usual
very
voice
vowel

W

wait
walk
want
war
warm
was
watch
water
wave
way
we
week
weight
were
west
what
wheel
where
which

W CONTINUED…

white
who
why
will
wind
winter
with
without
woman
wonder
wood
word
words
work
world
would
write
wrong

Y

year
yes
you
young

X