Many words in English are formed from the same root or base word. By adding different suffixes, a range of new words can be formed. A suffix is a letter or a group of letters that are added to the...
Find out more about verb suffixes and how they can extend your vocabulary as well as help you remember meanings of new words. A suffix is a letter or a group of letters that are added to the end of...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=74j6u5Hj_wQ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A5uRYi-GKKE https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L8KkvKnK_10 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3pSKGf3Es7I  
Possessives: questions Level: beginner We use whose to ask questions about possession: Pattern A Pattern B Whose coat is this? or Whose is this coat? Whose book is that? or Whose is that book? Whose pens are those? or Whose are those pens? Whose bags are those? or Whose are those bags?   Be careful! Be careful not to confuse whose and who's (= who is). They are pronounced in the same way but spelled differently: Whose coat is...
Possessives: pronouns Level: beginner Subject Object Possessive adjective Possessive pronoun I me  my mine you you your yours he him  his his she her  her hers it it its - we us  our ours they them  their theirs   Be careful! Possessive pronouns do not have an apostrophe: Is that car yours/hers/ours/theirs? (NOT Is that car your's/her's/our's/their's?) We can use a possessive pronoun instead of a full noun phrase to avoid repeating words: Is that John's car? No, it's mine. (NOT No, it's .) Whose coat is this? Is it yours? (NOT Is it ?) Her coat...
Level: beginner Possessives Adjectives Subject Object Possessive adjective I me my  you you your he him his she her her it it its we us our they them their We use possessive adjectives: to show something belongs to somebody: That's our house. My car is very old. for relations and friends: My mother is a doctor. How old is your sister? for parts of the body: He's broken his arm. She's washing her hair. I need to clean my teeth. Be careful! The possessive adjective its does not have an apostrophe...
We add 's to singular nouns to show possession: We are having a party at John's house. Michael drove his friend's car. We add ' to plural nouns ending in -s: This is my parents' house. Those are ladies' shoes. But we use 's with irregular plural nouns: men women children people These are men's shoes. Children's clothes are very expensive. We can use a possessive instead of a full noun phrase to avoid repeating words: Is that John's car? No,...
We use quantifiers when we want to give someone information about the number of something: how much or how many. Sometimes we use a quantifier in the place of a determiner: Most children start school at the age of five. We ate some bread and butter. We saw lots of birds. Quantifiers with...
The interrogative determiners are which and what. which is a specific determiner Here are three books. Which book do you think is the most interesting? They have four boys. Which boy is the oldest? I can’t remember which house Janet lives in. Which restaurant did you go to? what is a general determiner What food do you like? I don’t know what job she...
The definite article the is the most frequent word in English. We use the definite article in front of a noun when we believe the listener/reader knows exactly what we are referring to: because there is only one: The Pope is visiting Russia. The moon is very bright tonight. Who is the president...
X