Emigrate or Immigrate-Eminent or Imminent

Emigrate or Immigrate-Eminent or Imminent
Emigrate or Immigrate-Eminent or Imminent

Emigrate or Immigrate-Eminent or Imminent

They might look very similar and sound almost the same but beware of these words: emigrate vs immigrate and eminent vs imminent. Take a look at how you can remember them in this video.

1. Watch the video

  1. Watch the video without captions to test your listening.
  2. Then watch it with captions to check your understanding.

You can switch on and off the captions in the video for this activity.

2. Activity

After watching the video, complete the following activity. Fill in the blanks with emigrate, immigrate, eminent or imminent.

1. The _____________ lecturer’s talk was sold out.

2. “It looks like a storm is _______________,” she said.

3. What are the steps to take if people want to _______________ to Australia?

4. When my parents ________________d from their home country, they didn’t bring much with them.

5. He decided to ________________ to the neighbouring country despite the ________________ danger.

Transcript:

Today’s English On The Go lesson is on emigrate or immigrate and eminent or imminent.

Emigrate and immigrate are two verbs we use to talk about moving to countries.

To emigrate means to leave your own country and go to another country.

My grandparents emigrated from India to Australia in the 1900s.

To immigrate means to enter another country.

My grandparents immigrated to Australia in the 1900s.

Here’s one way to remember the difference between the two.

Emigrate means to exit.

Emigrate and exit start with an e.

Immigrate means to come in.

Both immigrate and in start with the letter i.

Then there’s eminent and imminent.

Eminent is an adjective.

It can refer to someone or something that is very prominent, famous or noteworthy.

She is an eminent leader.

The eminent professor was awarded a medal for his work.

Imminent is also an adjective.

It can mean that something is about to happen very soon.

The CEO’s departure was imminent.

We knew a thunderstorm was imminent.

To remember the difference, you can think of leader and professor.

Both have Es in the them.

So if you’re talking about a famous or prominent leader, you need to use eminent with an e.

Answers to activity:

1. The eminent lecturer’s talk was sold out.

2. “It looks like a storm is imminent,” she said.

3. What are the steps to take if people want to immigrate to Australia?

4. When my parents emigrated from their home country, they didn’t bring much with them.

5. He decided to immigrate to the neighbouring country despite the imminent danger.

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