Give the gift of English this holiday season!

Are you looking to improve your general English skills in a fun and interesting way?

Missing Person is like your favorite TV series, but much easier to understand!

Missing Person is a mystery story written especially for adults learning English. It is written in the form of a standard mystery novel with 12 episodes, but is written at an English level that is easier to understand.

Get it here.

Each episode contains 6 parts:

1. Story Video (Comfortable, slower speed)

2. Explanation Video

3. Story Video (Normal speed)

4. Glossary (all key vocabulary with definitions + sample sentences)

5. Culture Note

6. Complete transcript of Story + Explanation

Watch each episode spoken at a comfortable speed, followed by an explanation of the story and the entire episode spoken at normal speed.

You can follow along with a transcript of every word said in each episode, and learn the vocabulary in each lesson from the Glossary section.

Every episode also comes with a Culture Note on a related topic.

Watching these episodes will help you learn useful and frequently-used words in English. It is for anyone who wants to improve their general knowledge of the language!

Course Length — 6 hours (3 hours 53 minutes video + text lessons)

Want even MORE English? Check out (take a look at) our Unlimited English Membership, with more than 1800 lessons on daily and cultural topics.

~Jeff

P.S. Like this English lesson? Get a FREE sample lesson (no money needed) – SIGN UP BELOW!

Just fill out the form below and we’ll send a FREE lesson to try!

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What Will I Learn in My Free Lesson?

Here is just a small part of what you’re going to learn in this free lesson:

  • What “take a rain check” means and how to use it in a conversation . . .
  • The difference between a “recluse” and a “busybody” . . .
  • Why “to fend OFF” means something from “to fend FOR” . . .
  • What it means to “take a rain check,” “keep to yourself,” and “to appoint (someone)” . . .
  • What a social secretary is . . .
  • The best way to use “to sort out” and “to turn down” . . .
  • How to use phrasal verbs like “to settle in” and “to settle down” (they’re not the same!) . . .





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