How to Use i.e. or e.g.

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We’ve probably all either seen or written the abbreviations i.e. and e.g. Some of us may have understood them, and some of us may have not been sure.

For example, perhaps we’ve come across a statement such as:

Please bring something to the potluck dinner (i.e., salad, appetizer, dessert).

The context of that statement doesn’t interfere with our ability to receive the central idea from it. But is the use of i.e. precise? Let’s discuss that.

How to Use i.e. or e.g.: A Little Bit of Latin

i.e. and e.g. are both abbreviations of Latin expressions.

id est (i.e.): “that is to say; in other words”

exemplī grātiā (e.g.): “for example”

The abbreviation i.e. restates or fully lists what precedes it. It identifies, amplifies, clarifies, or specifies to remove all doubt about what the previous statement is saying.

The abbreviation e.g. gives one or a few examples from a larger grouping. It helps to illustrate a preceding thought but does not restate, list, or summarize it.

In our potluck example above, we can safely assume that the dinner selections might include more than just salads, appetizers, and desserts (i.e., the foods cited represent a larger group as opposed to the full list). The correct reference therefore would be e.g.

Note that because we are identifying partial information by way of example, we would not include etc. with an e.g. reference.

Correct: Please bring something to the potluck dinner (e.g., salad, appetizer, dessert).
Incorrect: Please bring something to the potluck dinner (e.g., salad, appetizer, dessert, etc.).

How to Use i.e. or e.g.: Mnemonic Devices

As we’ve touched on, remembering that i.e. stands for id est and e.g. stands for exemplī grātiā is one way to recall the difference between the abbreviations.

Another memory device can be to note that the est in id est means “is” (part of “that is”). For remembering the proper use of e.g., you might recall the exemplī meaning “example” in “for example.”

If the Latin devices don’t suit you, another technique can be to think of i.e. as “in effect” and e.g. as “example given.”

How to Use i.e. or e.g.: Punctuation

In formal writing in the U.S., a leading tendency is to follow the abbreviations with a comma and enclose the text in parentheses.

Examples
Macy said she’d join us at the tavern at 6:30 p.m. (i.e., 7:00 in Macy time).
Please bring something to the potluck dinner (e.g., salad, appetizer, dessert).

In recent years, some editors have allowed the comma to be omitted. This might be seen more often in less-formal contexts such as marketing content.

Examples
You’ll love how your face feels with the new Guide-n-Glide razor (i.e. handsome, fresh, and clean).
Larry the Lawn Guy beautifies what you have on your landscape (e.g. trees, shrubs, and seasonal flowers).

If the text following the abbreviation is a full sentence, the abbreviation would be preceded by a semicolon and the following text would not be enclosed by parentheses.

Examples
You’ll love how your face feels with the new Guide-n-Glide razor; i.e., it will feel handsome, fresh, and clean. (Style choice is comma after i.e.)
Larry the Lawn Guy beautifies what you have on your landscape; e.g. he trims and shapes your trees, shrubs, and seasonal flowers. (Style choice is no comma after e.g.)

To remove all doubt of intended meaning and usage, some language stylists might even prefer that i.e. and e.g. not be used at all; rather, they will advise the full spelling of the phrases in English (that is to say, in other words; for example). The phrases would be followed by a comma.

Examples
Macy said she’d join us at the tavern at 6:30 p.m. (in other words, 7:00 in Macy time).
Please bring something to the potluck dinner (for example, salad, appetizer, dessert).

If you don’t already adhere to a particular stylebook or in-house guideline, you can choose the format that suits you best and remain consistent with it.

 

Pop Quiz

Choose the correct use of i.e. or e.g. in each sentence that follows.

1. Chandra is talented in many different sports ([i.e., / e.g.,] tennis, track, volleyball). 

2. Frank has a flair for formal prose; [i.e., / e.g.,] the man knows how to write well.

3. We will give you the standard discount on your tires ([i.e., / e.g.,] twenty percent). 

4. Quentin Tarantino has directed several memorable films ([i.e., / e.g.,] “Reservoir Dogs,” “Pulp Fiction,” “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood”).

5. Allison loves 1980s hair bands ([i.e., / e.g.,] bands from the decade that played hard rock or heavy metal and whose musicians typically had big, long, teased-out hair).

 

Pop Quiz Answers

1. Chandra is talented in many different sports (e.g., tennis, track, volleyball). 

2. Frank has a flair for formal prose; i.e., the man knows how to write well.

3. We will give you the standard discount on your tires (i.e., twenty percent). 

4. Quentin Tarantino has directed several memorable films (e.g., “Reservoir Dogs,” “Pulp Fiction,” “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood”).

5. Allison loves 1980s hair bands (i.e., bands that played metal or hard rock music and whose members typically had big, long, teased-out hair).

The post How to Use i.e. or e.g. first appeared on The Blue Book of Grammar and Punctuation.



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