Speak like a Manager: Verbs 1



This “Speak like a Manager” lesson teaches you eight English verbs with hundreds of uses. A real vocabulary hack to learn English faster then ever! Learn to use the words identify, resolve, motivate, focus, minimize, maximize, generate, and implement. These verbs are especially useful in business and professional situations. You’ll learn powerful collocations or word combinations to use these eight advanced verbs in hundreds of creative ways. Make sure to subscribe to get all the lessons in my Speak like a Manager series (https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLxSz4mPLHWDamTa4xW7tkb-roADpiT5Jf).

GET THE FREE LIST OF 100+ BUSINESS ENGLISH COLLOCATIONS HERE: https://www.engvid.com/english-resource/speak-like-a-manager-100-business-english-collocations/
TAKE THE QUIZ: https://www.engvid.com/speak-like-a-manager-verbs-1/

WATCH NEXT:
How to change basic English into business English:

TRANSCRIPT

Hi. I’m Rebecca from engVid. Today I’m especially excited to welcome you to a new series that I’ve created called: “How to Speak like a Manager”. In this series you will learn how to take general English and upgrade it to business English. Okay? And we’ll be doing that by looking at different verbs that you can use, adjectives, nouns, and so on. Okay? But today in this lesson we will be focusing on eight verbs. But you might be asking: “Only eight verbs and I can become a manager?” Well, yes. “Why?” Because I’m going to show you how these eight verbs, to start with, can actually be used in hundreds of ways, in different collocations or combinations of words, so therefore you’ll be able to use them in all kinds of situations. Definitely in professional situations, but also in social situations or personal situations. Okay? So, let’s start right now. Okay.

So let’s suppose what you want to say in general English or regular English is something like this: “I need to find out what’s wrong.” Okay? Now, on this side is all the regular English or the general English. Okay? And on this side we’re going to express the same idea, but in higher English, in more advanced business English or more professional English. And you’re going to help me because I didn’t write the word in yet. You’re going to help me because perhaps you already know some of these words, but even if you know them you might not realize how many different ways we can actually use those same words, and that’s what I want you to be able to do. Okay? So suppose your idea in your mind is that: “I need to find out what’s wrong.” So how can we say that in more professional English? “I need to”, the verb starts with “i”: “I need to _______ the problem. I need to identify the problem.” Okay? So, our first word today is “identify”. Say it after me: “identify the problem”. Good.

Now, suppose the idea you’re trying to convey is: “I need to fix the problem.” Okay? “Fix” is a very ordinary word, so what better word could we use here? “I need to _______ the issue or the issues. I need to”, you might know this word. “I need to resolve”, okay? So, “resolve” is just like “solve”, but usually we say: “Solve the problem”, but we might say: “Resolve the issue”. And “resolve” is an even higher, more advanced word. And the higher vocabulary that you use, the more professional you will sound. Okay? And that’s what our goal is. Right?

Okay, next: “I need to give people confidence.” So what’s a good word or verb for that? “To give somebody confidence” is to, something starts with “m”: “I need to _______ my employees. I need to…” Do you know this word? I’m sure you’ve heard it. “Motivate”. Okay? Say it after me: “Motivate” or “motivate”. You can say the “t”; sometimes it’s easier and clearer for people to understand you when you say the “t”. So let’s say the “t” now: “Motivate. I need to motivate my employees” or: “I need to motivate my employees.” Okay? Instead of saying: “I need to give people confidence”, because you see that all the verbs here are very ordinary, everyday verbs, and those are higher-level verbs.

Next: “I need to give clients my attention.” Again, we have a very weak verb here, so how can you say that: “I need to give my attention to my clients or give clients my attention”? The word… The verb starts with “f”: “I need to _______ on our clients.” What’s the verb? Do you know it? “I need to focus”, okay? Say it after me: “Focus”. Be careful how you pronounce this word because otherwise it can sound improper. All right? “I need to focus on our clients.” Sounds a lot better than saying: “I need to give my attention to my clients.” Okay? “I need to focus”.

Next: “I need to spend as little as possible”. “Spend as little” means spend as little money. So what’s one word that captures that idea, to spend as little as possible? It starts with “m”: “I need to _______ our expenses or our costs.” Do you know what it is? Okay? So the word is “minimize”. […]

source

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.