Threw vs. Through: What’s the Difference?


Threw and through are two words that sound exactly the same (making them homonyms), but with completely different meanings. That makes them easy to tell apart, once you know the distinctions.

In today’s post we will explore the meaning of each, give you some examples, and quiz you on the difference. Ready to get started?

The Meaning of Threw

The word threw is the past tense of throw. Throw and threw primarily indicate the propelling, projecting, or casting of something with a forward motion or direction. It can also describe mental, emotional, or figurative action, as in “the witness statement threw the courtroom into confusion.”

Here are some examples of threw in a sentence:

Tim threw the pass for our winning score in last weekend’s game.
Our math teacher threw us a big challenge with today’s brain teaser.
The crashing waves threw our small boat miles off course.
The lamp threw long shadows across the floor.

As you can see, threw relates to an action.

The Meaning of Through

The word through is an adverb, adjective, or preposition.

As an adverb, it means “in at one end or side and out the other” or “all the way; the whole distance”: The bus goes all the way through to the west side of town.

As an adjective, it means “having completed an action or process”: When will Scott be through with his studies?

As a preposition, it means “in at one end or side and out the other” as well as “past, beyond”: I’ve always said that the tough times hurt, but we just have to get through them.

Remembering the Difference Between Threw and Through

Although they sound the same when spoken, threw and through have different meanings. Simply remember that threw is a verb describing an action and through is an adverb, adjective, or preposition depending on how it is used in a sentence.

Pop Quiz

Use threw or through correctly in the sentences below.

  1. The doctor reassured us that swallowed chewing gum will pass [threw / through] the body.
  2. I was sure I [threw / through] my coat in the closet, but I can’t find it anywhere.
  3. Jackie [threw / through] her knee out of joint during the last mile of the race.
  4. Could I borrow that magazine when you are [threw / through] reading it?
  5. We have a dozen meetings scheduled for next week, but somehow we’ll get [threw / through] them.

 

Pop Quiz Answers

  1. The doctor reassured us that swallowed chewing gum will pass through the body.
  2. I was sure I threw my coat in the closet, but I can’t find it anywhere.
  3. Jackie threw her knee out of joint during the last mile of the race.
  4. Could I borrow that magazine when you are through reading it?
  5. We have a dozen meetings scheduled for next week, but somehow we’ll get through

 

Looking for More Grammar Tips?

Like other languages, American English has its own characteristics that become more familiar with study and use. GrammarBook.com is here to help you refine your grammar for precise and eloquent expression in American English. Visit us again soon for more useful tips. Leave a comment or suggest a grammar topic below!

If the article or the existing discussions do not address a thought or question you have on the subject, please use the “Comment” box at the bottom of this page.



Source link

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here